This recording was made on Dec. 13, 2015 on the 3rd Sunday of Advent, by Fr. Daniel Liu  Please visit http://www.baylorcatholic.org for more information.

 

To download click here.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

This recording was made on Dec. 6, 2015 on the 2nd Sunday of Advent, by Fr. Daniel Liu  Please visit http://www.baylorcatholic.org for more information.

 

To download click here.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

This recording was made on Nov. 29, 2015 on the 1st Sunday of Advent, by Fr. Daniel Liu  Please visit http://www.baylorcatholic.org for more information.

 

To download click here.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

This recording was made on Nov. 22, 2015 on the Feast of Christ the King, Fr. Daniel Liu  Please visit http://www.baylorcatholic.org for more information.

 

To download click here.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

This recording was made on November 8, 2015 by Fr. Jonathan Raia, Vocation Director for the Diocese of Austin.

Please visit http://www.baylorcatholic.org for more information.

 

To download click here.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

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As a freshman, you quickly realize that you have nothing figured out. You enter college thinking that acting like an adult will be easy, but are quickly knocked down when things aren’t as easy as they appear. Finding your place becomes much more difficult than expected. In my first few weeks at Baylor, I met plenty of people that I liked and connected with, yet there was one small aspect of community that I missed. I missed the feeling of a family, a home away from home. My parish back in Minnesota had always served this purpose for me, and I was nervous that I wouldn’t come close to finding that at Baylor. I thought I could never find my home here. St. Peter’s showed me that clearly I didn’t have that figured out either.

I signed up for New Student Retreat thinking that, if anything, it would be nice to decompress after the first month of school. From the minute I walked into St Peter’s, I could feel the joy that seemed to radiate off of every person. It seemed to be chaotic, but the kind of beautiful chaos typically experienced at large family holidays. I readied myself for what would be a very interesting weekend.

The weekend that followed became one of the most impactful times of my life. The first moment that stood out to me was meeting my table family. I may be a bit biased, but my table family was by far the best. From the start of the retreat, I was given people to turn to and talk to about whatever I needed. My “parents” were incredibly kind and made me feel as though I was part of an actual family. Throughout the weekend, each and every person I met made me feel welcome and at home at St. Peter’s. Whether it was someone simply introducing themselves or my table parents assuring me that they had been praying for me, I knew that I had found my home away from home. As a freshman, this is all that I wanted, a place to call home and people to call a family.

Not only was the retreat fun and joyful, but there was a clear devotion to prayer and faith. At every quiet moment, someone would ask if we could do a rosary or say another prayer. I saw a desire to constantly grow closer to God in each person at the retreat. Reconciliation was offered on Friday night, and people were eager to go. Most places I had been, eager would not be the word to describe peoples’ feelings about Reconciliation. Eager is the word I would use to describe much of what I saw. The people I met were eager to learn more about faith, eager to pray even more, eager to share what they experienced, and eager to devote themselves entirely to God. I was inspired, to say the least. I was compelled to draw closer to God and develop a deeper relationship. The weekend ended with affirmations. Half of us sat in a circle with our eyes closed as the others walked around the circle. Statements such as “someone who made you laugh,” “someone you saw Christ in,” and “someone who made you feel welcome,” were read as people tapped the shoulders of the people that had done such things for them. It was in those moments when I realized that someone had seen Christ in me that I sat in wonder. The people that had inspired me also saw Christ in me. I realized that my faith was visible, that in some way or another, I was imitating Christ. It is this realization that made me more passionate about being Catholic, and being very open about it.

Throughout the weekend, I found myself saying “thank you, God” each and every chance I could. I would look up at the beautiful night sky, and whisper, “thank you, God”. I looked at the Eucharist and thought, “thank you, God”. I saw the incredible, Christ-like people around me, and all I could think to say was “thank you, God”. I can never thank God enough for bringing the people of St. Peter’s into my life. The New Student Retreat was an unforgettable experience that has impacted my life far more than I could have ever hoped for. Each time I walk into St. Peter’s, I feel like I’ve returned home. I open the doors and see my family, loud and joyous as ever.

I have learned that I don’t have everything, or really anything figured out, but with St. Peter’s, I’ve seen that I have people that will help me figure it out, my family.


Emily is a Freshman from Savage, Minnesota studying Physics. Thanks for sharing Emily! 

Did you know that there are former Baylor Catholics out there currently pursuing Religious Life? We are going to spotlight three of them in the upcoming weeks. Here is Hillary’s story!


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The seed of becoming a nun was first planted in my heart when I was going through Confirmation classes at St. Peter’s in Waco in 2011. Fr. Anthony talked to us about nuns being the brides of Christ, and I remember especially loving the idea of wearing a wedding ring symbolizing that complete consecration.  Then I started dating a guy I liked, and I took my dream job working at a camp before taking another dream job working at a nonprofit in Austin, putting off this idea of becoming a nun for about four years. However, the seed that had been planted never died, and it finally reached the point that I had to address this desire within me or I wouldn’t be able to continue my life with peace of mind. After taking off work to hike the Camino de Santiago and visit Fr. Martin, my monk cousin at the Monastero di San Benedetto in Norcia, Italy, it was evident that my heart was longing to seek God in the monastic life. The monks recommended I visit several communities, and after visiting them all it was clear that the Abbey of St. Walburga was a place I could see myself calling home. I felt God’s love there in so many ways, and knew I would regret not returning to the abbey for their three month “live-in” experience.

Those three months were a complete roller coaster. I became very homesick because I’m so close to my family and friends. In fact, I was convinced for the majority of my visit that I would not be returning to St. Walburga’s after the three months were over. I realized during my time there that I could do anything with my life as long as I do it out of love for God, trusting in His Mercy to save me, and that He was not going to force me to be a nun. I found so much freedom in the truth that His will for me is simply for me to humble myself before Him and accept His infinite love and compassion for me, which is wonderful because that’s exactly what we do in the Mass when we confess our sins and receive Him in the Eucharist. From that point onward I knew that He would love me no matter what, whether I decided to be a missionary, raise a family, become a nun, or anything else. However, one week before returning home, on the Feast of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, He gave me the grace to desire to be a fool for love of Him.  Although I knew I could do many other things and be pleasing to Him, His love impelled me on that day to resolve to return to Him the most love I possibly can with this short life I have, surrendering to Him my entire being through choosing to live by the same evangelical virtues which Jesus Himself embraced; because He is worth it! He loves us so much. So I asked Mother Maria Michael if I could enter the community, and we set the date for Sept. 8, 2015, which is the Feast of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary. Please pray for me, that I will persevere in loving and praising God with my whole being and surrender myself to being guided by the Spirit throughout this life journey.

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I wasn’t quite sure what to expect on my first day of NSR. Up until the retreat, I had lived my faith openly and tried to attend as many Daily Masses as I could, but I still seemed to be lacking something in my faith experience. A Latin phrase comes to mind, now, when I reflect on my experience: ubi amor, ibi oculus. It translates to “The eyes see better when guided by love.”

Going into the retreat, my main concern was that I didn’t have many Catholic friends at Baylor. I have my friends from line camp and in my dorm, but I hadn’t found any devout Catholic friends to associate with. That’s not to say I haven’t met some wonderful Christians here—they’ve truly helped guide me into being a better person, and have definitely had my back these last two months at Baylor. But I still felt like I was missing something.

By the time we got to the retreat house, I had lightened up quite a bit. I figured “I’ve had a great time jamming out in the car here, I’m sure the other people here are just as cool.” And everyone definitely was—but I still didn’t feel like I was belonging to the community. There were a lot of upperclassmen there, and everyone seemed to know each other already. I decided to put this worry off to the side and concentrate more on my spiritual time there at the retreat.

The first talk came on about confession, and I tuned in to listen. I knew that it was something I needed. After listening to the talk, I wrote down some things going on in my heart and was one of the first people in line for confession. It was really a relief—I had confessed a few times before with Fr. Daniel, but it really felt this time that I was speaking with Jesus. I hadn’t even committed any nerve-wracking sins; I was more grateful that I had someone to talk to and who could understand some of my incessant worries that had been building up prior to the retreat. After absolution, I knew I needed some quiet time with Jesus and I sat outside in silent prayer on the porch for a while.

I remember looking at a great tree growing through the porch, and sitting in awe at the way God was working in my heart then. I knew I was going to make friends, but was that the really worry in my heart? I took out and held my rosary and prayed to Mary for comfort: “Mary, my little Mother, I know you’re guiding my heart and watching me. Thank you for simply being present with me, holding me, and drawing me ever closer to the Heart of Jesus. I trust in You.” In a much deeper state of peace now, I walked back into the praise and worship session with confidence.

It wasn’t even friends that I had been looking for, I finally discovered, at the retreat. I still made friends, but I more importantly discovered my deeper sense of self in Christ. The next few days were honestly a blur, but the most important memory I can think of is the affirmation session. At this time in the retreat, before the affirmations started, I was having a slight existential crisis. I kept worrying about the future, what my major was going to be, and that I wasn’t in high school anymore. After someone on the mic announced that it was time for us to close our eyes for affirmations, I thought “well alright I’ll just put these questions on the side.”

Even typing now I can still remember the joy I felt at knowing that I belonged, and that I had a Christ-like influence on others. I was genuinely surprised at the amount of people who tapped my shoulders for different affirmations. “[Tap] someone you prayed for… Someone you saw Christ in this weekend.”  I remember feeling the most taps for “someone you saw Christ in this weekend,” and my heart soared. People didn’t just know me. They saw Christ in me. I then realized that what I needed was a reality check. My deepest identity is not an honor student, a hard-worker, a nice-guy or anything else I tie to myself. My deepest identity is within Christ.

I needed the love of others to guide me closer to Christ. “The eyes see better when guided by love.”  Ubi amor, ibi oculus.

Jake Shanley is a freshman from The Woodlands, Texas.

Please forgive the editor for the title. She’s a sucker for a good alliteration.


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A couple of weeks ago, with about 10 days notice, I got the incredible news that I was going to get to see Papa Frankie, the most adorable human on earth, address a joint session of Congress in Washington D.C.! I felt wholly blessed and unworthy to go, but I knew that I couldn’t pass up the opportunity. Being there was absolutely surreal. Getting up at 2 AM to walk a couple of miles in D.C. (In business casual I might add) by 3 AM didn’t seem like much of a sacrifice, nor did waiting in dewy grass for several hours because WE WERE GOING TO SEE THE POPE!

The anticipation was almost palpable when the moment finally came for the Holy Father to speak to Congress. The hush of a previously lively crowd of thousands was astounding, but it didn’t last long. After what seemed like every sentence that came out of His Holiness’ mouth, there were roars of cheering and applause. I can only attribute what happened next to the Pope’s role as Vicar of Christ. I found myself holding back tears of joy and many around me had tears flowing silently. One woman held another woman, who was clearly a stranger, saying, “Yes! It’s him! It is our Holy Father!” Everyone was emotionally overwhelmed and it was clear that the entire crowd was won over and over again with each topic he spoke an undeniable truth about.

Now, I was happy and excited with everything he had to say, but when he was finished I was frankly a little disappointed he didn’t bring up abortion. He alluded to it, of course, which made some in the crowd hold back on cheers, but he never even said the word ‘abortion’. I don’t want to criticize Pope Francis, but what message was this sending to our nation? Then I realized; he was speaking to our nation.  This wasn’t a homily; he wasn’t in a room of Catholics or even God-fearing Christians for that matter, he was speaking to the representatives of a country that is just about as religiously diverse as it gets. People already know the church doesn’t approve of abortion, gay marriage, transsexualism etc. but they don’t realize or have forgotten the capacity of the Church’s love. People have started to see the Catholic Church as cold, unaccepting, and flat out bad because its social teaching is counter to that of our society. They’ve forgotten the church is good! It is one that believes in mercy. This message of goodness was the one Pope Francis chose to send.

During the papal visit to the United States, I heard a newscaster say several times that “Pope Francis was the most popular man in the world”.  This newscaster marveled at the crowds that the Holy Father could draw and at his ability to gain the respect and love of non-Catholics, and even non-Christians. His example of goodness and mercy allows for the doors to Christ to be opened wide sometimes, if I’m being honest, wider than I thought they could go, even to those actively working against Jesus’ teachings. It is specifically because of Pope Francis’ humble missionary spirit that hearts are being cared for, healed, and ultimately won for our Lord. Pope Francis wants to lead by example so it is only right that we follow and be excited show grace to everyone more readily. It is only by succeeding in this we can demonstrate that the Catholic Church is beautiful and it is good. I can definitely see how I can grow in this in my own life, so this was incredibly meaningful to me. Overall, I feel really fortunate that I was able to learn from the Holy Father and be in Washington at this historic moment.


Brianna is a Junior Speech Pathology Major from San Antonio, TX. 

 

Greetings fellow Knights, friends of St. Peter’s, and blog readers. It is your very favorite, friendly neighborhood Platypus Bear here to tell you all about the KoC college conference that Derek and I had the opportunity to attend this year.

I would like to start with a bit of the History of the Knights as many of you, like myself when I first joined may be a little hazy on what the Knights as an organization do. So way back in the late 1800s there was a man today known as Venerable Father Michael J. McGivney. Father McGivney’s story is nothing short of remarkable, but due to an unfortunate word limit I’ll give you all the gist: there were two very notable events in Father McGivney’s life that led him to found the Knights. the first being while he was in Seminary, his father passed away. With no Breadwinner for the family to sustain itself, Michael was forced to leave seminary to help his family until receiving a scholarship and being stationed at St. Mary’s in New Haven, Connecticut. Second, was the loss of the breadwinner of a family friend of his which led to the government threatening to take away the children of the mother who could not provide, Father Michael stepped in, became legal guardian of one of her boys, then the night of the court meeting called to order the first meeting of the Knights of Columbus. Father McGivney was tired of the struggles young Catholic families were put through when the father, unfortunately passed away so came the Knights, dedicated to providing for the widow and the orphan of their fellow Catholic brothers, Father McGivney founded this Fraternal organization, primarily as an insurance for these families, but also so that men could be sure, they could rely on their fellow Brother Knights to provide for their families should anything ever happen to them.

 

Fast forward a century and some change, and you have the Knights as we know them today. Rated one of the top five most ethical companies, with billions of dollars in support for the families of it’s many insurance members; it is no wonder the Knights are regarded as “The Strong Right Arm of the Church”. Derek and I got to see this first hand at the conference, and all the good work that each college has done. with over 200 College Councils Worldwide the growing involvement of young men is inspiring. I had the opportunity to talk to a few knight from different councils, hearing their struggles, especially those on secular campuses that are avidly against anything to do with the Faith, was something that merited my respect. Among these struggles there are Councils out there that still go out of their way to continue Father McGivney’s vision of defending the widow and orphan, Knights who volunteer at Retirement homes, take part in Pro-life discussions, help lead youth groups, volunteer at women’s shelters, and so many other things that make me proud to be a part of this order. Us as Baylor Council received a reward for our participation in the Special Olympics, we received the Youth Service Activity Reward for dedicating over 250 man hours to the Special Olympics.

Being recognized reminded me of the good we do as Knights and the good the Knights do worldwide. For the young gentlemen reading this that are not members of the order, I encourage you, seek out the next initiation, join our brotherhood and be a part of an organization that has done so much good for the Church. My fellow brother knights, I implore you attend this Conference the next chance you get, it was a serious eye opener to all the things that we do as Knights that you probably don’t even know of ! I am proud to be a Knight and proud to be a member of Baylor’s council 13577 VIVAT JESU!

 

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About the Author:

Sam Esparza is a real life Platypus Bear, his hobbies include Jeopardy, smoking a pipe, making wild Platypus Bear Calls in the open, and making deep meaningful memories with his friends.

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It was an honor and a blessing to be able to go down to Austin today and do our part to defend life. #txrally4life Happy St. Patrick's Day!!! St. Patrick, pray for us! 🙏 Happy feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe!! We are praying for you!! Do you stand firm in God's grace?? Where is He leading you?? Will you follow??
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